Japan’s other lost Kong film: King Kong Appears in Edo (1938)

The success of 1933’s King Kong not only resulted in the Japanese production of a silent comedy short spin-off that same year, but also helped the Japanese discover their love of kaiju–or, giant monster–cinema. Unfortunately, their next attempt at a Kong film might have had even less to do with Kong than the last one.Continue reading “Japan’s other lost Kong film: King Kong Appears in Edo (1938)”

A disappointing second act?: Son of Kong (1933)

In the Depression-era United States, Merian C. Cooper’s 1933 cinematic epic King Kong was so popular that RKO higher-ups demanded a sequel be made right away. Unfortunately for the production team, “right away” meant “about as long as it takes a baby to gestate.” We’re doing a bit of an ensemble piece, here, as Mike,Continue reading “A disappointing second act?: Son of Kong (1933)”

Japan’s (first) lost Kong film: Wasei Kingu Kongu (1933)

Immediately upon its release, Merian C. Cooper’s 1933 spectacle King Kong was a Depression-era smash hit–not just in the United States, but all across the globe. King Kong was so popular that even Imperial Japan caught Kong fever when Shochiku Studios distributed the film to Tokyo theaters in Autumn 1933. As history buffs and weeaboosContinue reading “Japan’s (first) lost Kong film: Wasei Kingu Kongu (1933)”

The mystery of the lost spider pit sequence

Merian C. Cooper’s 1933 monster masterpiece King Kong came under the knife of censors when it was re-released in 1938, but all of the scenes that were removed at that time have been since restored and reinserted. Even so, Kong is still missing one very infamous scene–not by act of censorship, but by design. AnytimeContinue reading “The mystery of the lost spider pit sequence”

The “Citizen Kane” of monster movies: King Kong (1933)

In the grand old year of 2020, it seems that there isn’t much left to say about King Kong that hasn’t already been said.  The “Citizen Kane” of monster movies has a timeless quality to it—the film is a certifiable masterpiece, no doubt about it.  Like Metropolis (1927), Jaws (1975), and Jurassic Park (1993), KongContinue reading “The “Citizen Kane” of monster movies: King Kong (1933)”

Kongtoberfest is upon us!

Ladies and gentlemen, I have an announcement to make: 2020 blows. This is an indisputable fact. The year 2020 has been a disaster. Several, in fact. And there’s still plenty of 2020 left. I’m not telling you something you don’t already know. Something you also probably know is that when the chips are down, alcoholContinue reading “Kongtoberfest is upon us!”