Drac Attack: Universal’s Contribution to the Legend of the Vampire Lord

Dracula, as you well know, is considered one of the major monsters of the modern world, his rule over the vampires nigh-indisputable and influence over the others strong enough for him to gather about him a coterie of the mightiest monsters to defend castles for him. The question, then, is when did Dracula become suchContinue reading “Drac Attack: Universal’s Contribution to the Legend of the Vampire Lord”

Kongtoberfest: An encore! (The Fictocast #006/007)

Kongtoberfest has come to an end, and we thank you all for your readership and kind words of encouragement! As Kongtoberfest comes to a close, we at The Fictosphere would like to leave you–our kind readers–with a Kong-sized special multi-media post finale. Comprised of podcast audio clips, videos, text (obviously), and pictures, this post isContinue reading “Kongtoberfest: An encore! (The Fictocast #006/007)”

The remake we didn’t need: King Kong (2005)

Throughout the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, Universal Pictures made several attempts–both half-hearted and full-blown–to remake RKO’s 1933 classic King Kong. After years in production hell, they finally released their version in 2005…for better or worse. It’s taken me a little while to write this entry, and after a bit of soul-searching, I’ve discovered that it’sContinue reading “The remake we didn’t need: King Kong (2005)”

The remake we deserved: King King (1996)

With Paramount having taken their crack at the 8th Wonder of the World with King Kong (1976) and King Kong Lives (1986), the ball was back in Universal’s court to make their own version of the Skull Island epic. It had been ten years since Paramount released its follow-up to the 1976 King Kong remakeContinue reading “The remake we deserved: King King (1996)”

Mediocre obscurity: Musing over King Kong Lives (1986)

With the relative success of Paramount’s 1976 King Kong remake, a sequel was sure to follow. What no one expected was the sequel that ultimately became King Kong Lives. For anyone who may have not noticed over the course of my writings & the subjects contained therein (or is just now dropping in), I’m somethingContinue reading “Mediocre obscurity: Musing over King Kong Lives (1986)”

Despised Inspiration: An Ode to King Kong (1976)

Though the race between Hammer, Universal, and Paramount went on into the 1970s, it was Paramount that won the rights to remake RKO’s 1933 epic King Kong. And in 1976, that remake was released to theaters. The face of a beautiful, blonde, white woman comes into focus. She appears conscious, yet also absent, not aContinue reading “Despised Inspiration: An Ode to King Kong (1976)”

Universal’s promising unmade Kong: The Legend of King Kong (1975)

Last time, we talked a bit about an unmade British remake of King Kong. But Hammer Studios wasn’t the only major film company of the 1970s attempting to remake RKO’s classic. I thought I’d take a moment to shed some light on the cancelled (and fairly obscure) Kong film that competed with the ’76 remakeContinue reading “Universal’s promising unmade Kong: The Legend of King Kong (1975)”

Kong save the Queen!: Hammer’s King Kong (1960s/1970s)

Toho’s version of RKO’s 8th Wonder of the World renewed interest in Kong, and so all the major production companies became interested in putting their own spin on the King of Skull Island. Background By the late 1960s, almost every major production company was interested in making a version of King Kong: Universal, Paramount, andContinue reading “Kong save the Queen!: Hammer’s King Kong (1960s/1970s)”

Willis O’Brien’s dream deferred: King Kong vs. Prometheus (Early 1960s)

With the character of King Kong firmly planted in the cultural zeitgeist, it would seem reasonable that the next official installment in the franchise would follow shortly after Son of Kong–but as of the early 1960s, RKO Studios still only had two Kong films in its library. Background Willis O’Brien, stop-motion genius and Kong’s originalContinue reading “Willis O’Brien’s dream deferred: King Kong vs. Prometheus (Early 1960s)”

Japan’s other lost Kong film: King Kong Appears in Edo (1938)

The success of 1933’s King Kong not only resulted in the Japanese production of a silent comedy short spin-off that same year, but also helped the Japanese discover their love of kaiju–or, giant monster–cinema. Unfortunately, their next attempt at a Kong film might have had even less to do with Kong than the last one.Continue reading “Japan’s other lost Kong film: King Kong Appears in Edo (1938)”