Kill your double in Nintendo’s Urban Champion

This was the last article I wrote for Examiner.com.  Three more were planned and/or drafted, but were never posted at Examiner.com.  At some point in the future, I will finish them and post them here. Originally published at Examiner.com on February 18, 2014. There’s a terrible stigma that comes with a thing being called “classic”. Continue reading “Kill your double in Nintendo’s Urban Champion”

Fiction vs. Reality: Farmville vs. SimCity

This article was meant to be the start of a series I’d have called “Fiction vs. Reality”, where I would take a hyper-realistic game and compare it to a game with a similar theme but rife with fantasy elements.  Of course, that never came into being–but maybe I’ll resurrect the idea here, on this blog.Continue reading “Fiction vs. Reality: Farmville vs. SimCity”

The remake we didn’t need: King Kong (2005)

Throughout the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, Universal Pictures made several attempts–both half-hearted and full-blown–to remake RKO’s 1933 classic King Kong. After years in production hell, they finally released their version in 2005…for better or worse. It’s taken me a little while to write this entry, and after a bit of soul-searching, I’ve discovered that it’sContinue reading “The remake we didn’t need: King Kong (2005)”

The remake we deserved: King King (1996)

With Paramount having taken their crack at the 8th Wonder of the World with King Kong (1976) and King Kong Lives (1986), the ball was back in Universal’s court to make their own version of the Skull Island epic. It had been ten years since Paramount released its follow-up to the 1976 King Kong remakeContinue reading “The remake we deserved: King King (1996)”

Kong save the Queen!: Hammer’s King Kong (1960s/1970s)

Toho’s version of RKO’s 8th Wonder of the World renewed interest in Kong, and so all the major production companies became interested in putting their own spin on the King of Skull Island. Background By the late 1960s, almost every major production company was interested in making a version of King Kong: Universal, Paramount, andContinue reading “Kong save the Queen!: Hammer’s King Kong (1960s/1970s)”

Willis O’Brien’s dream deferred: King Kong vs. Prometheus (Early 1960s)

With the character of King Kong firmly planted in the cultural zeitgeist, it would seem reasonable that the next official installment in the franchise would follow shortly after Son of Kong–but as of the early 1960s, RKO Studios still only had two Kong films in its library. Background Willis O’Brien, stop-motion genius and Kong’s originalContinue reading “Willis O’Brien’s dream deferred: King Kong vs. Prometheus (Early 1960s)”

Japan’s other lost Kong film: King Kong Appears in Edo (1938)

The success of 1933’s King Kong not only resulted in the Japanese production of a silent comedy short spin-off that same year, but also helped the Japanese discover their love of kaiju–or, giant monster–cinema. Unfortunately, their next attempt at a Kong film might have had even less to do with Kong than the last one.Continue reading “Japan’s other lost Kong film: King Kong Appears in Edo (1938)”

Japan’s (first) lost Kong film: Wasei Kingu Kongu (1933)

Immediately upon its release, Merian C. Cooper’s 1933 spectacle King Kong was a Depression-era smash hit–not just in the United States, but all across the globe. King Kong was so popular that even Imperial Japan caught Kong fever when Shochiku Studios distributed the film to Tokyo theaters in Autumn 1933. As history buffs and weeaboosContinue reading “Japan’s (first) lost Kong film: Wasei Kingu Kongu (1933)”

The mystery of the lost spider pit sequence

Merian C. Cooper’s 1933 monster masterpiece King Kong came under the knife of censors when it was re-released in 1938, but all of the scenes that were removed at that time have been since restored and reinserted. Even so, Kong is still missing one very infamous scene–not by act of censorship, but by design. AnytimeContinue reading “The mystery of the lost spider pit sequence”

The “Citizen Kane” of monster movies: King Kong (1933)

In the grand old year of 2020, it seems that there isn’t much left to say about King Kong that hasn’t already been said.  The “Citizen Kane” of monster movies has a timeless quality to it—the film is a certifiable masterpiece, no doubt about it.  Like Metropolis (1927), Jaws (1975), and Jurassic Park (1993), KongContinue reading “The “Citizen Kane” of monster movies: King Kong (1933)”